Aromobatidae

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Aromobatidae_table_infobox_0

AromobatidaeAromobatidae_header_cell_0_0_0
Scientific classification AromobatidaeAromobatidae_header_cell_0_1_0
Kingdom:Aromobatidae_cell_0_2_0 AnimaliaAromobatidae_cell_0_2_1
Phylum:Aromobatidae_cell_0_3_0 ChordataAromobatidae_cell_0_3_1
Class:Aromobatidae_cell_0_4_0 AmphibiaAromobatidae_cell_0_4_1
Order:Aromobatidae_cell_0_5_0 AnuraAromobatidae_cell_0_5_1
Clade:Aromobatidae_cell_0_6_0 HyloideaAromobatidae_cell_0_6_1
Superfamily:Aromobatidae_cell_0_7_0 DendrobatoideaAromobatidae_cell_0_7_1
Family:Aromobatidae_cell_0_8_0 Aromobatidae

Grant [; ], Frost, Caldwell, Gagliardo, Haddad [], Kok, Means, Noonan, Schargel, and Wheeler [], 2006Aromobatidae_cell_0_8_1

Subfamilies and generaAromobatidae_header_cell_0_9_0

The Aromobatidae are a family of frogs native to Central and South America. Aromobatidae_sentence_0

They are sometimes referred to as cryptic forest frogs or cryptic poison frogs. Aromobatidae_sentence_1

They are the sister taxon of the Dendrobatidae, the poison dart frogs, but are not as toxic as most dendrobatids are. Aromobatidae_sentence_2

Taxonomy Aromobatidae_section_0

The Aromobatidae were separated from the Dendrobatidae only in 2006, and some sources continue to treat these frogs as part of the Dendrobatidae. Aromobatidae_sentence_3

However, their position as the sister taxa is well supported, and the question is primarily about whether they should be ranked as a family or a subfamily. Aromobatidae_sentence_4

The validity of subfamilies within the Aromobatidae is also unsettled. Aromobatidae_sentence_5

Some evidence points to paraphyly of at least the subfamily Anomaloglossinae, and genus Allobates, largely because of the uncertain placement of Allobates olfersioides. Aromobatidae_sentence_6

Reproduction Aromobatidae_section_1

Many aromobatids deposit small clutches of eggs in terrestrial nests. Aromobatidae_sentence_7

After hatching, one of the parents transports the tadpoles to a small water body, where they complete their development to metamorphosis. Aromobatidae_sentence_8

Anomaloglossus stepheni, Anomaloglossus degranvillei, Allobates chalcopis, and Allobates nidicola are four aromobatid species that have non-feeding tadpoles. Aromobatidae_sentence_9

Subfamilies and species Aromobatidae_section_2

By late 2019, 126 species in three subfamilies and five genera had been described: Aromobatidae_sentence_10

Aromobatidae_unordered_list_0

  • Allobatinae Grant, Frost, Caldwell, Gagliardo, Haddad, Kok, Means, Noonan, Schargel, and Wheeler, 2006 (55 spp.)Aromobatidae_item_0_0
    • Allobates Zimmermann and Zimmermann, 1988 (55 spp.)Aromobatidae_item_0_1
  • Anomaloglossinae Grant, Frost, Caldwell, Gagliardo, Haddad, Kok, Means, Noonan, Schargel, and Wheeler, 2006 (32 spp.)Aromobatidae_item_0_2
    • Anomaloglossus Grant, Frost, Caldwell, Gagliardo, Haddad, Kok, Means, Noonan, Schargel, and Wheeler, 2006 (30 spp.)Aromobatidae_item_0_3
    • Rheobates Grant, Frost, Caldwell, Gagliardo, Haddad, Kok, Means, Noonan, Schargel, and Wheeler, 2006 (two spp.)Aromobatidae_item_0_4
  • Aromobatinae Grant, Frost, Caldwell, Gagliardo, Haddad, Kok, Means, Noonan, Schargel, and Wheeler, 2006 (38 spp.)Aromobatidae_item_0_5
    • Aromobates Myers, Paolillo-O., and Daly, 1991 (18 spp.)Aromobatidae_item_0_6
    • Mannophryne La Marca, 1992 (20 spp.)Aromobatidae_item_0_7

In addition, "Prostherapis" dunni Rivero, 1961 is placed in this family, but its more precise placement is unknown; it might be an Aromobates. Aromobatidae_sentence_11


Credits to the contents of this page go to the authors of the corresponding Wikipedia page: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aromobatidae.