Australian Recording Industry Association

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"ARIA" redirects here. Australian Recording Industry Association_sentence_0

For other uses, see Aria (disambiguation). Australian Recording Industry Association_sentence_1

Australian Recording Industry Association_table_infobox_0

Australian Recording Industry AssociationAustralian Recording Industry Association_table_caption_0
AbbreviationAustralian Recording Industry Association_header_cell_0_0_0 ARIAAustralian Recording Industry Association_cell_0_0_1
FormationAustralian Recording Industry Association_header_cell_0_1_0 1983; 37 years ago (1983)Australian Recording Industry Association_cell_0_1_1
TypeAustralian Recording Industry Association_header_cell_0_2_0 Trade groupAustralian Recording Industry Association_cell_0_2_1
LocationAustralian Recording Industry Association_header_cell_0_3_0 Australian Recording Industry Association_cell_0_3_1
WebsiteAustralian Recording Industry Association_header_cell_0_4_0 Australian Recording Industry Association_cell_0_4_1

The Australian Recording Industry Association (ARIA) is a trade group representing the Australian recording industry which was established in 1983 by six major record companies, EMI, Festival, CBS, RCA, WEA and Universal replacing the Association of Australian Record Manufacturers (AARM) which was formed in 1956. Australian Recording Industry Association_sentence_2

It oversees the collection, administration and distribution of music licenses and royalties. Australian Recording Industry Association_sentence_3

The association has more than 100 members, including small labels typically run by one to five people, medium size organisations and very large companies with international affiliates. Australian Recording Industry Association_sentence_4

ARIA is administered by a Board of Directors comprising senior executives from record companies, both large and small. Australian Recording Industry Association_sentence_5

As of October 2010, the directors were Denis Handlin (chair, CEO of Sony Music), George Ash (Universal Music), Mark Poston (EMI), Sebastian Chase (MGM Distribution), David Vodica (Rubber Records/Music) and Tony Harlow (WAR). Australian Recording Industry Association_sentence_6

History Australian Recording Industry Association_section_0

In 1956, the Association of Australian Record Manufacturers (AARM) was formed by Australia's major record companies. Australian Recording Industry Association_sentence_7

It was replaced in 1983 by the Australian Recording Industry Association, which was established by the six major record companies operating in Australia, EMI (now part of Universal Music Group), Festival Records, CBS (now known as Sony Music), RCA (now part of Sony Music), WEA (now known as Warner Music Group) and Polygram (now known as Universal). Australian Recording Industry Association_sentence_8

It later included smaller record companies representing independent acts/labels and has over 100 members. Australian Recording Industry Association_sentence_9

By 1997, the six major labels provided 90% of all recordings made in Australia. Australian Recording Industry Association_sentence_10

ARIA is administered by a Board of Directors comprising senior executives from record companies, both large and small. Australian Recording Industry Association_sentence_11

As of October 2010, the directors were Denis Handlin (chair, CEO of Sony Music), George Ash (Universal Music), Mark Poston (EMI), Sebastian Chase (MGM Distribution), David Vodica (Rubber Records/Music) and Tony Harlow (WAR). Australian Recording Industry Association_sentence_12

Australian TV pop music show Countdown presented its own annual awards ceremony, Countdown Music and Video Awards, which was co-produced by Carolyn James (a.k.a. Carolyn Bailey) during 1981–1984 in collaboration with ARIA. Australian Recording Industry Association_sentence_13

ARIA provided peer voting for some awards, while Countdown provided coupons in the related Countdown Magazine for viewers to vote for populist awards. Australian Recording Industry Association_sentence_14

At the 1985 Countdown awards ceremony, held on 14 April 1986, fans of INXS and Uncanny X-Men scuffled during the broadcast and as a result ARIA decided to hold their own awards. Australian Recording Industry Association_sentence_15

Since 2 March 1987, ARIA administered its own entirely peer-voted ARIA Music Awards, to "recognise excellence and innovation in all genres of Australian music" with an annual ceremony. Australian Recording Industry Association_sentence_16

Initially included in the same awards ceremonies, it established the ARIA Hall of Fame in 1988 and has held separate annual ceremonies since 2005. Australian Recording Industry Association_sentence_17

The ARIA Hall of Fame "honours Australian musicians' achievements [that] have had a significant impact in Australia or around the world". Australian Recording Industry Association_sentence_18

In February 2004, the Australian Record Industry Association (ARIA) announced its own legal action against Kazaa, alleging massive copyright breaches. Australian Recording Industry Association_sentence_19

The trial began on 29 November 2004. Australian Recording Industry Association_sentence_20

On 6 February 2005, the homes of two Sharman Networks executives and the offices of Sharman Networks in Australia were raided under a court order by ARIA to gather evidence for the trial. Australian Recording Industry Association_sentence_21

In 2006, ARIA formed sponsorship deals with Motorola and Nova and changed the appearance and conduct of the charting. Australian Recording Industry Association_sentence_22

Motorola took naming-rights sponsorship seeing the charts referred to in the media as the Motorola ARIA Charts. Australian Recording Industry Association_sentence_23

ARIA, have commented that as part of the same marketing printed charts would be reintroduced into media retailing shops and their website would be redesigned. Australian Recording Industry Association_sentence_24

As part of the deal Nova began broadcasting the charted singles in reverse order on a Sunday afternoon show before it was released on the ARIA charts website. Australian Recording Industry Association_sentence_25

In 2020, ARIA in partnership with the New South Wales government announced Great Southern Nights, an initiative to bring 1,000 coronavirus-safe gigs in venues from across Sydney to regional NSW. Australian Recording Industry Association_sentence_26

The bid to revive NSW’s live music industry already has more than 20 artists committed to performing, including Amy Shark, The Jungle Giants, Birds of Tokyo, Paul Kelly, Missy Higgins, The Teskey Brothers, The Veronicas and the Tones, Thelma, Tash and Presets. Australian Recording Industry Association_sentence_27

The shows will follow up-to-date state health advice on venue capacity and social distancing regulations. Australian Recording Industry Association_sentence_28

ARIA charts Australian Recording Industry Association_section_1

Main article: ARIA Charts Australian Recording Industry Association_sentence_29

The ARIA Charts is the main Australian music sales charts, issued weekly by the Australian Recording Industry Association. Australian Recording Industry Association_sentence_30

The charts are a record of the highest selling singles and albums in various genres. Australian Recording Industry Association_sentence_31

All charts are compiled from data of both physical and digital sales from retailers in Australia. Australian Recording Industry Association_sentence_32

ARIA certifications Australian Recording Industry Association_section_2

A music single or album qualifies for a platinum certification if it exceeds 70,000 copies shipped to retailers and a gold certification for 35,000 copies shipped. Australian Recording Industry Association_sentence_33

The diamond certification was created for albums in November 2015 to mark 500,000 sales/shipments. Australian Recording Industry Association_sentence_34

For music DVDs (formerly videos), a gold accreditation originally represented 7,500 copies shipped, with a platinum accreditation representing 15,000 units shipped. Australian Recording Industry Association_sentence_35

Australian Recording Industry Association_table_general_1

FormatAustralian Recording Industry Association_header_cell_1_0_0 Current Accreditation LevelsAustralian Recording Industry Association_header_cell_1_0_1
GoldAustralian Recording Industry Association_header_cell_1_1_0 PlatinumAustralian Recording Industry Association_header_cell_1_1_1 DiamondAustralian Recording Industry Association_header_cell_1_1_2
AlbumAustralian Recording Industry Association_header_cell_1_2_0 [nb 1]35,000Australian Recording Industry Association_cell_1_2_1 [nb 1]70,000Australian Recording Industry Association_cell_1_2_2 [nb 2]500,000Australian Recording Industry Association_cell_1_2_3
SingleAustralian Recording Industry Association_header_cell_1_3_0 [nb 3]35,000Australian Recording Industry Association_cell_1_3_1 [nb 3]70,000Australian Recording Industry Association_cell_1_3_2 N/AAustralian Recording Industry Association_cell_1_3_3
Music DVDAustralian Recording Industry Association_header_cell_1_4_0 7,500Australian Recording Industry Association_cell_1_4_1 15,000Australian Recording Industry Association_cell_1_4_2 N/AAustralian Recording Industry Association_cell_1_4_3

Prior to ARIA taking on the role of certification authority in 1983, the music industry used the following certification levels: Australian Recording Industry Association_sentence_36

Australian Recording Industry Association_table_general_2

FormatAustralian Recording Industry Association_header_cell_2_0_0 Accreditation Levels used until 1983Australian Recording Industry Association_header_cell_2_0_1
GoldAustralian Recording Industry Association_header_cell_2_1_0 PlatinumAustralian Recording Industry Association_header_cell_2_1_1 DiamondAustralian Recording Industry Association_header_cell_2_1_2
AlbumAustralian Recording Industry Association_header_cell_2_2_0 20,000Australian Recording Industry Association_cell_2_2_1 50,000Australian Recording Industry Association_cell_2_2_2 N/AAustralian Recording Industry Association_cell_2_2_3
SingleAustralian Recording Industry Association_header_cell_2_3_0 50,000Australian Recording Industry Association_cell_2_3_1 100,000Australian Recording Industry Association_cell_2_3_2 N/AAustralian Recording Industry Association_cell_2_3_3

ARIA Awards Australian Recording Industry Association_section_3

ARIA No. 1 Chart Awards Australian Recording Industry Association_section_4

The ARIA No. Australian Recording Industry Association_sentence_37

1 Chart Awards were established in 2002 to recognise Australian recording artists, who reached number one on the ARIA albums, singles and music DVDs charts. Australian Recording Industry Association_sentence_38

ARIA Music Awards Australian Recording Industry Association_section_5

Main article: ARIA Music Awards Australian Recording Industry Association_sentence_39

The ARIA Music Awards is an annual series of awards nights celebrating the Australian music industry. Australian Recording Industry Association_sentence_40

The event has been held annually since 1987; it encompasses the general genre-specific and popular awards known as the ARIA Awards, as well as the Fine Arts Awards and Artisan Awards (held separately from 2004), Lifetime Achievement Awards and the ARIA Hall of Fame (held separately from 2005 to 2010 but returned to the general ceremony in 2011). Australian Recording Industry Association_sentence_41

Criticisms Australian Recording Industry Association_section_6

Like most recording industry associations, ARIA has been criticised for fighting copyright infringement matters aggressively, although in Australia this has largely taken the form of aggressive advertising campaigns particularly in cinemas directly preceding movies. Australian Recording Industry Association_sentence_42

This criticism is stauncher in Australia due to the absence of an equivalent Digital Millennium Copyright Act or state crimes acts which clearly establish copyright infringement as a crime. Australian Recording Industry Association_sentence_43

In February 2004, the Australian Record Industry Association (ARIA) took legal action against Kazaa, alleging massive copyright breaches. Australian Recording Industry Association_sentence_44

The trial began on 29 November 2004. Australian Recording Industry Association_sentence_45

On 6 February 2005, the homes of two Sharman Networks executives and the offices of Sharman Networks in Australia were raided under a court order by ARIA to gather evidence for the trial. Australian Recording Industry Association_sentence_46

ARIA has been criticised by former Australian Idol judge and record producer Ian Dickson for a perceived intolerance of Australian Idol contestants, and a lack of nomination in the ARIA Awards. Australian Recording Industry Association_sentence_47

See also Australian Recording Industry Association_section_7

Australian Recording Industry Association_unordered_list_0


Credits to the contents of this page go to the authors of the corresponding Wikipedia page: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Australian Recording Industry Association.